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Mindfulness Exercises For Buddhists

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Deepen your Buddhist practice with our free mindfulness exercises, guided meditations, mindfulness worksheets and more. 

Three Mindful Meditation Techniques to Start the Day

Three Mindful Meditation Techniques to Start the Day

Three Mindful Meditation Techniques to Start the Day entails the building of awareness of mind, heart, and body-- wonderful process for Meditation ...
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Dont Forget To Celebrate [Video]

Don’t Forget To Celebrate [Video]

Learn how to appreciate the small expressions of joy, enthusiasm, gratitude, and pride to lead effectively by watching this video ...
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Love Yourself (Self Confidence Exercise)

Love Yourself (Self Confidence Exercise)

Use this self-confidence exercise daily to teach you to love yourself. You are worthy of loving yourself, as treating yourself as a wonderful person ...
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Having an Inner Smile FI

Having an Inner Smile

Having an inner smile means we’re greeting our experience with more kindness and openness. Here are ways to maintain an inner smile in everyday life ...
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Guided Meditation by Phillip Moffitt [Audio]

Guided Meditation by Phillip Moffitt [Audio]

Guided Meditation by Phillip Moffitt. The core teaching on how to do mindfulness, how to practice it. Mindful in the body and the body ...
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Lesson from Nature, depression and anxiety binaural beat

Depression & Anxiety (Binaural Beat)

Binaural Beat for Depression & Anxiety. Binaural beats are auditory illusion perceived by the brain when two different tones are played into each ear ...
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caring for yourself in an integrated way

Caring For Yourself in an Integrated Way

To begin this Mindfulness Exercise on Caring For Yourself, please bring kind awareness to- why you chose this topic- how your belly, chest, and head each feel when you reflect ...
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Love Is The Answer

Love Is The Answer

Spring Washam talks about the topic Love Is The Answer. She also talks about opening the heart, freedom, and joy, having faith and trust over the journey of suffering ...
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Several Meditation In One

Several Meditations In One

Several Meditations in One is an expansive form of Guided Meditation Script that combines several meditations from different sorts and virtues and emotions ...
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Breathing Into Stress Detox

“Breathing Into” Stress Detox

This mindfulness exercise provides guidance on the Breathing Into Stress Detox practice, which helps release tension and stress that builds up in the body ...
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Thich Nhat Hanh Steps of Mindful Breathing

Thich Nhat Hanh – Steps of Mindful Breathing

This video presents steps of mindful breathing by Thich Nhat Hanh. Watch this video to learn the steps needed for mindful breathing in your meditation ...
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Lesson from Nature, Pain Relief

Pain Relief (Binaural Beat)

Binaural Beat for Pain Relief. Binaural beats are auditory illusion perceived by the brain when two different tones are played into each ear ...
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saturating your being with appreciation

Saturating Your Being With Appreciation

To begin this Mindfulness Exercise on Appreciation, please bring kind awareness to- why you chose this topic- how your belly, chest, and head each feel when you reflect on this topic- the emotions that ...
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Lesson from Nature, Energizing Your Body

Energizing Your Body (Binaural Beat)

Binaural Beat for Energizing Your Body. Binaural beats are auditory illusion perceived by the brain when two different tones are played into each ear ...
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stress eating

Stress Eating

Psychological stress caused by feelings of anxiety affects our lives in many ways that we don't see. It affects sleep patterns, relationships and health ...
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Energy For Action [Video]

Energy For Action [Video]

1.3: How to Energize Yourself for Change (The Gap) from Fred KofmanBy Fred KofmanPhilosopher and Vice President at LinkedinAction arises from dissatisfaction. It is purposeful striving towards something. Its ultimate ...
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How To Become Your Own Hero [Video]

How To Become Your Own Hero [Video]

Integrity has the power to transform situations that seem like a curse into a blessing. By being response-able, you can turn into a (moral) hero ...
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Guided Meditation with Lama Surya Das [Video]

Guided Meditation with Lama Surya Das [Video]

This is a wonderful meditation with Lama Surya Das on the Great Luminous Perfection teachings of Dzogchen. Meditation is ideal, start emptying your mind ...
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17 of the BEST Affirmations for Your Morning

Best Affirmations For Your Morning

Give your day a boost and a positive kick start, enthusiasm and self love by listening to these 17 affirmations for your morning ...
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Jealous People Video

Jealous People [Video]

Useful strategies that will help you deal with jealous people in your life without being affected by their negative words and actions ...
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Mindfulness for holiday stress

Working With Pain

Ajahn teaches Buddhist wisdom on life's difficulties. How pain is ever present in our life. And how we deal with it, work with it is the key ...
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Preparing for Dying

Preparing for Dying

According to Buddhist teacher Frank Ostaseski, dying is more about relationship than medicine. This relationship includes mastery, meaning, and mystery ...
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Nature of Awareness

Sacred Fertilizer

Sacred Fertilizer- sometimes we need a powerful dose of challenges, tribulations, crisis such as loss of loved ones or unbearable feelings to awaken ...
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Nature of Awareness

Heart Practices for Awakening Joy

James Baraz talks about how mindfulness is the tool to awaken the joy in life; how opening the heart lets many blessings to flow ...
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Ruth Denison

Instructional Sit with Body Sweep [Audio]

Instructional Sit with Body Sweep, by Ruth Denison:About Ruth Denison:Ruth Denison studied in Burma in the early 1960s with the meditation master Sayagi U Ba Khin. She has been teaching ...
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MAN vs EARTH [Video]

MAN vs EARTH [Video]

Man vs. Earth is a short eye-opener that delivers the no-nonsense truth on how man has ravaged the Earth at a huge price of the home under our feet ...
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How To Focus Your Attention

How To Focus Your Attention

This guided meditation by Sean Fargo is about How To Focus Your Attention. Relax and stay alert at the same time, focusing your attention to the breath ...
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Get Focused With Mindfulness Worksheets

Get Focused With Mindfulness Worksheets

From managing a busy schedule to tuning in to your own intuition, these worksheets allow you to dive confidently & get focused with mindfulness ...
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Flowering of Compassion

The Flowering of Compassion

Mark Coleman talks about the Flowering of Compassion. Mark explains we live in a world of heartful connectedness. The real path lies in loving-kindness ...
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Dr. Andrew Weil The Pursuit of Happiness

Dr. Andrew Weil: The Pursuit of Happiness

In our pursuit of happiness, we tend to see it as a goal. Dr. Andrew Weil argues that we need to work for contentment instead ...
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Self Sabotage

Self Sabotage

Even though we believe we’re interested in happiness, many of us go in for a particular kind of destructive behaviour: self-sabotage. Why, and what might we do to stop ourselves?Instance ...
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Rewriting Your Bad Day

Rewriting Your Bad Day

Rewriting Your Bad Day. No day is 100% bad. You can train the mind to recognize both the good & bad, helping you see clearly the enjoyable moments ...
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Stopping Obsessive Thoughts About The Past

Stopping Obsessive Thoughts About The Past

Stopping Obsessive Thoughts About The Past. This mindfulness practice helps you see rumination patterns clearly, respond to them with patient understanding ...
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Doing What You Want

Doing What You Want

To begin this Mindfulness Exercise on Doing What You Want, please bring kind awareness to- why you chose this topic- how your belly, chest, and head each feel when you reflect ...
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The SHOCKING Meaning of Row Row Row Your Boat

Shocking Meaning Of Row Row Row Your Boat

In this interesting video the nursery rhyme Row Row Row Your Boat is given a different, and entirely shocking, meaning. Watch this video and find out ...
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SuperBrain Yoga Offers a New Mindfulness Technique

SuperBrain Yoga Offers a New Mindfulness Technique

SuperBrain Yoga is a new mindfulness technique that uses the principles of acupuncture and breathing to make the brain work at its peak performance ...
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Finding Me (A Journey To Get To Know Yourself & Where You Want To Be)

Finding Me (A Journey To Get To Know Yourself & Where You Want To Be)

Get to know yourself through guided meditations and reflections to yourself. Find your way to yourself with this mindfulness exercise ...
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How Your Gut Influences Your Mental Health It’s Practically a Second Brain Dr. Emeran Mayer

Emeran Mayer: Gut Influences Mental Health – Second Brain

Neuroscientists now think of the gut as a "second brain"; it independently controls your digestive processes and is in constant conversation with your main brain. The Mind-Gut Connection is something ...
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Dealing with Death - Alan Watts, Jason Silva

Dealing with Death

The reason we die is to give us the opportunity to understand what life is all about. The process of life continues like the passing of the torch ...
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Simple Sleep Meditation

Simple Sleep Meditation

Simple Sleep Meditation. A guided meditation for sleep, this one has listeners feeling deeply into the comforts of sleep. It's simple, sweet, & soothing ...
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How To Take Charge Of Your Life

How To Take Charge Of Your Life

In order to take charge of your life, you need to be a player rather than a victim. Own your choices and claim your personal power through responsibility ...
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Mindfulness exercise, Judging Mind, no self no problem

Working With The Judging Mind

James Baraz talks about working with the judging mind on meditation practice. Sometimes the best ones who can perform deep meditation are the worse ones ...
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Taking Care of Yourself

Taking Care of Yourself

To begin this Mindfulness Exercise on Taking Care of Yourself, please bring kind awareness to- why you chose this topic- how your belly, chest, and head each feel when you reflect ...
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Mantra Meditation FI

Mantra Meditation

Mantra Meditation. Do you feel like you think too much, or that your thoughts are driving you crazy? Mantra meditation may be one way to help ...
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Be the Pebble

Be the Pebble

We are often caught up in a stormy sea of stress & anxiety. This mindfulness exercise will help you become the pebble that sinks beneath the chaotic waves ...
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Mindfulness and Buddhism

While mindfulness in and of itself does not require we practice Buddhism, we cannot practice Buddhism without understanding and embodying mindfulness. Buddhism is a religion and philosophy that has stood the test of time, having been founded over 2,500 years ago by Siddhartha Gautama. As a cornerstone of Buddhist philosophy, mindfulness practice has been explored and embodied for centuries. Its presence is so strong and deeply rooted that mindfulness, often referred to as sati, is often considered the first step one takes towards enlightenment.

Understanding Sati

Sati is the first of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment, though it is a component of each and every stage. According to the Buddhist tradition, mindfulness can be defined as, “moment to moment awareness of the present moment.” It is not something we can possess or hold onto; rather, it a process we experience again and again.

Mindfulness, or sati, can also be understood as:

  • Bare attention, or non-conceptual awareness
  • Correct view, or clear seeing
  • Non-judgmental awareness
  • Awareness of reality
  • Remembering, or bearing in mind

Remembering, as it is understood in the Buddhist sense, does not refer to the recollection of past events by the egoic mind; rather, it is a reminder to pay “bare attention” when the mind has wandered, or when we have moved away from the present moment. In this way, mindfulness has the ability to remind us to focus on what is happening right here and now. Not only is mindfulness the art of paying attention, it is also what calls us back when our attention has flittered away.

Mindfulness in the Buddhist Tradition

The Buddhist roots of mindfulness are powerful reminders of what this process or practice is and what it is not. Happiness or relaxation are often falsely associated with mindfulness; meanwhile, Buddhism reminds us that mindfulness is not conditional in any way. In the Buddhist practice of mindfulness, everything is observed without judgment. While what is observed in the mind might be noted as happiness, the presence of this state is not necessary for the practice to be complete or “correct.”

Many modern views of mindfulness focus on the idea of the primary or individual self, harbouring, however unconsciously, the notion of the separate self. Buddhism, on the other hand, views life as a conglomerate of flowing energy that creates our thoughts, our feelings, and our experience. Through movement towards enlightenment, the self is liberated from its sense of separateness.

It is important to note that the separate self does not need to be rejected or judged in any way; rather, it is something that Buddhist mindfulness practice eventually moves us through. Our experience of the separate self can be observed just like anything else. This understanding is a crucial component to the expansion of one’s mindfulness practice. These ancient insights provide us with signposts to help us move past our attachment to our experiences and our stories and our strong sense of the separate self. They encourage us to witness the present moment reality from a clearer, or more absolute, vantage point.

How Buddhism Promotes Mindfulness

Buddhism promotes mindfulness through a variety of techniques and modes of exploration. To better understand the ways in which it is practiced in this tradition, mindfulness can be explored through its four foundations: mindfulness of body, mindfulness of feelings, mindfulness of mind, and mindfulness of dhammas.

1. Mindfulness of body

Including mindfulness of breathing, awareness of the body, contemplation on the reality of the physical body, reflection on the material reality, and awareness of the body’s impermanence

2. Mindfulness of feeling

Different from emotion, feelings in this sense are broken down into awareness of risings that are: pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant; bodily and mental; worldly and unworldly

3. Mindfulness of mind

Involves awareness of mental states such as distraction, concentration, hatred, lust, or retraction

4. Mindfulness of dhammas, or mind objects

  • Awareness of Five Hindrances (desire, anger, sloth, worry, doubt)
  • Awareness of the Five Aggregates of Clinging (form, feeling, perception, mental-formations, consciousness)
  • Awareness of the entry points of consciousness (eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, and mind)
  • Mindfulness of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment (mindfulness, investigation of dhammas, energy, joy, relaxation, concentration, and equanimity)
  • Mindfulness of the Four Noble Truths (suffering, the origin of suffering, the cessation of suffering, and the path leading to the end of suffering)

These four cornerstones provide a framework through which we can begin to explore mindfulness. Typically, we would explore one at a time, beginning with breath awareness and then moving outwards from there. Eventually, we reach the Four Noble Truths, coming to understand intuitively (rather than intellectually or theoretically) how one can move towards the absence of suffering.

The End of Suffering through Mindfulness

According to Buddhist philosophy, we suffer not because we are inherently “wrong” or “bad” but because we do not understand the reality of nature. Buddhism introduces us to the three marks of existence: impermanence, suffering, and insight. Mindfulness and contemplation of these aspects of our existence help us to move through our suffering as we gain a deeper understanding of the absolute reality of nature.

The Pali word for suffering is dukkha, a term that can be more completely understood as:

  • The physical or mental suffering that comes from the cycle of life (the transition through birth, growth, illness, and death)
  • The emotional aspect of our humanity, including sorrow and grief
  • Attachment to things that, by nature, change constantly
  • Lack of satisfaction or the feeling of expectations not being met

We gain insight into dukkha by increasing mindfulness of the Buddhist understanding of life. As we come to understand and accept the flow of nature and the impermanency of everything (from thoughts to physical possessions), we begin to overcome whatever rests at the root of our suffering. This deeper level of awareness increases our experience of contentment with whatever exists. We find ourselves in greater flow with the cycles of everything life comprises of.

​Buddhist Mindfulness Practices

Mindfulness practice in Buddhism is often believed to be highly associated with meditation, but it much more than this. The practice of being mindful can be carried throughout every aspect of our lives, touching the ways we interact with others, the way we walk, the way we eat, and the way we do just about anything. In studying Buddhism philosophy, it is not uncommon to find ourselves becoming instinctively more mindful of how we tread on this earth on a daily basis and of our interconnectedness to all things.

There are a variety of different ways we can deepen our awareness of the present moment. Countless online resources exist to help guide us into deeper levels of understanding. Three techniques and practices with roots in the Buddhist tradition are listed below.

Breath Awareness

Mindfulness of body is most simply explored through awareness of the breath. To practice, come into a comfortable seated position with the spine straight and the shoulders relaxed. You may sit cross legged on the floor or in a straight-backed chair. Rest your hands in your lap or on your thighs as you come into a state of stillness.

Draw your awareness to your breath without changing it in anyway. Keep your focus on this movement of energy into and out of your body, calling upon mindfulness to help refocus your attention when the mind wanders.

Keep the heart open, remaining compassionate towards whatever you experience. Refrain from judging the present moment in anyway. Continue to breathe mindfully, drawing your attention back to the breath again and again. You may sit here for any period of time that suits your needs.

Loving Kindness Meditation

Within the Buddhist tradition, Loving Kindness meditation, or Metta meditation, is a practice that helps to keep the heart open and compassionate. It supports insights as through this practice, we come to realize our interconnectedness on a more profound level.

To practice, come to a seated position with your back straight and shoulders relaxed. Take a few moments to settle into the space and then draw your attention to the center of your chest. Breathe through this space.

Once you feel grounded, bring yourself to mind. With eyes closed, observe the presence of yourself in your mind’s eye exactly as you are. Open your heart to this individual and when you are ready, softly repeat the words:

May you be loved, may you be safe, may you be happy, may you be at peace.
May you be loved, may you be safe, may you be happy, may you be at peace.

Take your time with this, allowing yourself to be completely present with these words as they permeate the image of your own being. Sit with this moment for as long as you need.

When you are ready, repeat the practice with three more people:

  • Someone you are close to
  • Someone you feel neutral towards
  • Someone you have a challenging relationship with

With each of these individuals, take your time to bring their image and essence to mind, repeating the same blessings to them.

May you be loved, may you be safe, may you be happy, may you be at peace.
May you be loved, may you be safe, may you be happy, may you be at peace.

Finally, repeat the same kind words to the Universe at large, holding the entire world in your awareness. Imagine all beings being blessed with light, love, and peace.

Allow all images to dissipate as you come back to silence. Focus on your breath for a while observing whatever arises in your field of awareness. When you are ready, you may slowly return to the physical world by gently opening your eyes.

Vipassana Meditation

Also known as Insight Meditation, Vipassana is a meditation technique that dates back to the earliest days of Buddhism. With roots in India, Gotama Buddha came upon the practice over 2500 years ago. It offers insight into the three marks of existence and moves us towards liberation from suffering. Vipassana is taught in 10-day retreats as the entire practice is considered to be a mental training.

The practice helps us to see things as they are and guides its students to pay focused attention to the sensations of the physical body. It is based on open observation and helps to connect the gap between mind and body.

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