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In this video on the Guided Mindfulness of Breathing, Joseph Goldstein lays us through the first foundation in the Satipatthana sutta.

Published on Jul 25, 2014

Guided Mindfulness of Breathing. Here Joseph Goldstein guides meditators through the first foundation in the Satipatthana sutta, the Buddha’s discourse on the foundations of mindfulness. For more sources of information: http://www.dhammatalks.net/ & http://www.naturalawareness.net/sutras.htm

The Satipatthana Sutta
Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was living in the Kuru country at a town of the Kurus named Kammasadhamma. There he addressed the monks thus, “Monks.” “Venerable sir,” they replied. The Blessed One said this:

[DIRECT PATH]
“Monks, this is the direct path for the purification of beings, for the surmounting of sorrow and lamentation, for the disappearance of dukkha and discontent, for acquiring the true method, for the realization of Nibbana, namely the four satipatthanas.

[DEFINITION]
“What are the four? Here, monks, in regard to the body a monk abides contemplating the body, diligent, clearly knowing and mindful, free from desires and discontent in regard to the world. In regard to feelings he abides contemplating feelings, diligent, clearly knowing, and mindful, free from desires and discontent in regard to the world. In regard to the mind he abides contemplating the mind, diligent, clearly knowing and mindful, free from desires and discontent in regard to the world. In regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas, diligent, clearly knowing and mindful, free from desires and discontent in regard to the world.

[BREATHING]
“And how, monks, does he in regard to the body abide contemplating the body? Here, gone to the forest, or to the foot of a tree, or to an empty place, he sits down; having folded his legs crosswise, sets his body erect, and established mindfulness in front of him, mindful he breathes in, mindful he breathes out.
“Breathing in long he knows ‘I breathe in long,’ breathing out long, he knows ‘I breathe out long.’ Breathing in short, he knows ‘I breathe in short,’ breathing out short, he knows ‘I breathe out short.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in experiencing the whole body,’ he trains thus: I shall breathe out experiencing the whole body,’ he trains thus: I shall breathe in calming the bodily formation,’ he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out calming the bodily formation.’ Just as a skilled turner or his apprentice, when making a long turn, knows ‘ I make a long turn,’ or when making a short turn knows ‘I make a short turn’ so too, breathing in long, he knows ‘I breathe in long,’

[REFRAIN]
“In this way, in regard to the body he abides contemplating the body internally, or he abides contemplating the body externally, or he abides contemplating the body both internally and externally. Or, he abides contemplating the nature of arising in the body, or he abides contemplating the nature of passing away in the body, or he abides contemplating the nature of both arising and passing away in the body. Or, mindfulness that there is a body is established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. “That is how in regard to the body he abides contemplating the body.”

~Translated from: Satipatthana: The Direct Path to Realization by Bhikku Analayo
Link to pdf – http://www.abhayagiri.org/media/discs/APasannoRetreats/2013%20Fourth%20Foundation%20of%20Mindfulness/Sources/Analayo_Satipatthana-The-Direct-Path-to-Realization.pdf

According to the commentaries, the repetition of the object of contemplation also indicates emphasis, implying that the object of contemplation should be considered simply as perceived by the senses, and in particular without taking it to be “I” or “mine”. In this way the repetition – body in body – underlines the importance of direct experience, as opposed to mere intellectual reflection. One should let the body speak for itself, so to say, disclosing its true nature to the scrutiny of the meditator.
~ Bhikkhu Analayo (from Satipatthana: The Direct Path to Realization)

Therefore, the Buddha continued, let dedicated followers of the Dhamma strive to be their own island of refuge, with the Dhamma as their island of refuge, not looking for any other refuge. Let them rely entirely on the powerful help of the four foundations of mindfulness (satipatthana). Those who, with keen desire, thus train themselves along the Noble the Eightfold Path will certainly pass beyond all the realms of darkness which abound in samsara.
From the book – Great Disciples of the Buddha: Their Lives, Their Works, Their Legacy

“Go forth, monks, for the happiness of the many, out of compassion for the world… There are beings whose eyes have little dust on them, who will perish if they do not hear the teaching. But if they hear the teaching, they will gain liberation.”
~ The Buddha

May everyone come into contact with the Buddhadhamma.
May everyone liberate themselves from the hindrances of greed, hatred and ignorance.
May we all live in happiness, joy and clarity.

 

To donate to Joseph Goldstein directly, visit http://www.dharma.org/joseph-goldstein

 

To donate to Joseph Goldstein directly, visit http://www.dharma.org/joseph-goldstein

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